Prosecco “Italian Champagne”

The first recorded mention of “Prosecho” as a wine is by English explorer and writer Fynes Moryson, who in 1593 listed Prosecco among the most famous wines of Italy. He wrote: “Here growes the wine Pucinum, now called Prosecho, much celebrated by Pliny”.

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Prosecco DOC

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Organic

Prosecco “Italian Champagne”

PROSECCO DOC

Denominazione di Origine Controllata

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Organic

 

Floral, citrus and subtle mint aromas are boldly pronounced in this wine. On the palate it is savoury with a light but zesty lemon finish, providing vibrant acidity.

Prosecco is the world’s largest selling sparkling wine, a popular fruit-driven style made from the Glera grape, which has gained massive acclaim worldwide in the past decade and even surpassed Champagne in 2014 in terms of sales volume.

The Glera grape probably has Slovenian origins, from the Karst region, and until not long ago it was known as Prosecco.

The name has been changed to Glera in 2009 following the enlargement of the Prosecco DOC, although Glera was actually a generic name identifying more than one varietal.

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Since then the name Prosecco was reserved for its designation of origin, being the name of the town where it is believed the wine originated from. Since the mid-13th century “Prosech” or “Prosechum”, which come from a Slovenian placename, was used to refer to a small town, which still exists today, near Trieste. The vineyards were located in the outskirts of the village, on the sunny slopes running down from Prosecco towards the sea, sheltered from the cold Bora winds.

 
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Thanks to our friends from Suavia for this beautiful photo.

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Although there is no genetic evidence, in the 16th century the wine from Prosecco started being associated with Pucinum, the wine produced in the same area during Roman times and mentioned in Pliny the Elder’s Naturalis Historia for its therapeutic properties. Apparently this wine was a favourite of Livia, wife of Emperor Augustus, who is said to have reached old age in good health thanks to its healing properties. Pietro Bonomo, a famous historian and diplomat of the time, was the first one to identify Prosecco as the heir of Pucinum and, from that moment on, the association PucinumProsecco became widely established.
The first recorded mention of “Prosecho” as a wine is by English explorer and writer Fynes Moryson, who in 1593 listed Prosecco among the most famous wines of Italy. He wrote: “Here growes the wine Pucinum, now called Prosecho, much celebrated by Pliny”.

Museo Nazionale Collezione Salce

AUTORE

Alicandri Vincenzo

TITOLO

Sanremo

SOGGETTO

Veduta del golfo della Spezia da un giardino

DATA

1925 post - 1928 ante

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Antonio Carpenè (18381902) is considered the father of modern Prosecco. He was a famous scientist, chemist, researcher and one of the first Italian sparkling wine producers and contributed to the development and progress of the entire sparkling wine sector. In 1868 he also founded the CarpenèMalvolti winery.

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His ambition was to producea sparkling wine of the highest quality that could compete with Champagne (the first sparkling wine he produced was called Italian Champagne), but with a technique that would enhance the organoleptic characteristics of the local grape. In 1873 sparkling Prosecco made its official debut at the Universal Exposition of Vienna. Prosecco nowadays represents the quintessence of conviviality and embodies the Italian lifestyle. For this reason and for its easy-going approachable style, it is conquering the palates of wine drinkers worldwide.